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For years the Indonesian government has chronically overspent its budget:  in 2017 the latest budget published had projected more than $130 billion in revenues but more than $160 billion in expenses. It does not appear likely that the national geology budget is making a major contribution to the deficit.

Indonesia produces about 800,000 barrels of crude oil per day. Indonesia exports about 300,000 barrels of crude per day and imports 500,000 barrels per day. At the same time, Indonesia was importing 600,000 barrels of refined petroleum per day and probably producing close to one million barrels of refined petroleum per day. The estimated crude oil reserves are about 3.3 billion barrels. This would be similar in volume to Malaysia  and Yemen and within the top 30 countries of the world (see below). That also means Indonesia can extract crude oil at the present rate for about ten years.

Crude_oil_reserves

Indonesia produces 72 billion cubic meters of natural gas, consumes 42 billion cubic meters of natural gas and exports the rest. There are very large natural gas reserves claimed – almost 3 trillion cubic meters.

 

Natural_gas_reserves

This would be similar in volume to Iraq  and Mozambique and within the top 15 countries of the world (see above). That also means Indonesia can extract natural gas at the present rate for about forty years.

A continuing problem for all countries is that liquid natural gas is expensive and dangerous to store and transport: most of the time if an oil tanker or a refinery has technical challenges crude oil gets spilled. In contrast, natural gas tends to burn.  By virtue of having so many islands, as opposed to being a monolithic landmass, Indonesia has to deal with pipelines, distributed storage and multiple LNG ports.

 

 

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